���������� ���������� �������������� ���� ���������� ������������������ bit.ly/psy3000 - International Crane Foundation - Page 4
 

Search results for "���������� ���������� �������������� ���� ���������� ������������������ bit.ly/psy3000"

Showing results for � � � � � � bit pyke botulu

Class of 2007

← Return to Biographies Two release methods were used in 2007: Ultralight-guided (Group One) and Direct Autumn Release (Group Two). All Whooping cranes released in 2007 under the aircraft-guided method learned a migration route by following Operation Migration’s aircraft from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Juneau County, Wisconsin, to Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus [...]

Read More >
Class of 2006

← Return to Biographies Two release methods were used in 2006: Ultralight-guided (Group One) and Direct Autumn Release (Group Two). Group Three includes the first successfully fledged wild hatched Whooping Crane in the Eastern Migratory Population! All Whooping crane released in 2006 under the aircraft-guided method learned a migration route by following Operation Migration’s aircraft from [...]

Read More >
Class of 2005

← Return to Biographies This is the first year the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership utilized two release methods: Ultralight-guided and Direct Autumn Release (DAR). The DAR method also involves costume handlers raising the young crane chicks in the field. The difference is that prior to the fall migration period, the young cranes are released to form [...]

Read More >
Class of 2004

← Return to Biographies All Whooping Cranes released in 2004 were raised by costumed handlers and learned a migration route by following Operation Migration's aircraft from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Juneau County, Wisconsin, to Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County, Florida. The 1200-mile southward migration began on October 10, 2004, and ended 64 days [...]

Read More >
Class of 2017

← Return to Biographies This year the reintroduction partnership is using two release methods: Group One - Modified Costume-Rearing (CR) and Group Two - Parent-Rearing (PR). Group Three includes any wild-hatched Whooping Crane chicks that survived to fledge and migrate south. The first group, consisting of seven young Whooping Cranes, was costumed-reared at White River Marsh [...]

Read More >
Class of 2003

← Return to Biographies The third year of the reintroduction! The aircraft-guided method was used to teach these young Whooping Cranes a migration route from the Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Central Wisconsin to Florida's Gulf coast at the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge. The southward migration began October 16, 2003, and ended 54 days and 1,191 [...]

Read More >
Class of 2002

← Return to Biographies All Whooping Cranes released in 2002 were raised by costumed handlers and learned a migration route by following Operation Migration's aircraft from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Juneau County, Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County, Florida. The 1200-mile southward migration began October 13, 2002, and ended 49 days later [...]

Read More >
Class of 2001 Whooping Cranes – The Pioneers!

← Return to Biographies This was the very first cohort of Whooping Cranes released into the Eastern Migratory Population! All Whooping Cranes released in 2001 were raised by costumed handlers and learned their migration route by following Operation Migration's ultralight aircraft from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Juneau County, Wisconsin, to Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in [...]

Read More >
Whoopsie, the Whooping-Sandhill Crane Chick

Crane chicks always cause a bit of a stir, but one in particular is making waves among Wisconsinites near its home in the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge and with craniacs everywhere. Affectionately named “Whoopsie,” the chick is a hybrid of a male Whooping Crane and a female Sandhill Crane. With all the excitement around this unusual mix comes much curiosity. Read on for answers to your most pressing “Whoophill” questions!

Read More >