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An Evening with the Cranes 2012

An Evening with the Cranes will be held at ICF’s headquarters in Baraboo, Wisconsin from 5:00 to 8:00 pm on Saturday, June 23, 2012. Tickets are $60 per person/$100 per couple.

Inspired by the regions where cranes live, people can expect delicious food and wine pairings created by Jim and Christine Dickey, owners of Little Village Café in Baraboo. Ignite your senses with exotic flavors, crane calls, and gorgeous trails winding through our prairie. During the evening you will have the opportunity to meet ICF Co-founder Dr. George Archibald, ICF scientists, educators, and of course, cranes!

Knock, knock…Who's there?

Knock before entering… A common courtesy, for example, when visiting a friend or relative’s home. Believe it or not, this simple concept can also be applied as a training tool to help calm nervous birds. A ‘knock’ signals to a bird that an aviculturist will be entering to do something in their space. This ‘something’ can be any number of routine husbandry tasks: from checking food and water buckets, to entering the pen with a large bucket to clean. Sometimes, a knock may just mean someone is coming to look in at you and toss you a treat.

Ultralight-led Whooping Cranes will be Released on Wheeler NWR

Nine juvenile Whooping Cranes on their first ultralight-led migration south will be taken to Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Morgan County, Ala. in the next few days. The nine Whooping Cranes will be placed in travel enclosures and loaded onto vehicles as soon as possible. They will be driven about 70 miles from Winston County, Ala., to Wheeler NWR. The cranes will be temporarily housed in a secure pen, during which time they will be fitted with identification bands and tracking transmitters. The young birds will then be released in the company of other Whooping Cranes that have been wintering at the refuge.

Sandhill Crane Hunt Update

In early February 2012 Wisconsin State Representative Joel Kleefisch introduced a bill proposing a regulated Sandhill Crane hunt in the state. The following update summarizes ICF’s role in the ongoing discussion of this issue.

Our Position: The International Crane Foundation does not endorse or oppose Sandhill Crane hunting in North America. We recognize the role of regulated hunting in current wildlife population management practices, and the importance of hunting traditions to communities, not just on this continent, but globally. We maintain three strong positions relative to crane hunting.

ICF Partners with U.S. State Dept to Study Pollutants in Mekong

ICF has worked in the Mekong River Basin since 1988, coordinating community projects, long-term wetland restoration activities, and training for a new generation of wetland managers. Working with eight founding institutions, ICF created the University Network of Southeast Asia in 2001 to establish a training program in wetland ecology and management for students and professionals in the Mekong Basin. Over the past ten years, this network has grown to include 18 member universities and has trained over 200 students in wetland management. Many are now leaders in universities and conservation organizations working within the region.

New Blue Crane Joins ICF Flock

On November 16, 2011, ICF received a young male Blue Crane from the National Zoological Park (NZP). The young crane, named Kito (Swahili for ‘precious child’) by ICF staff, was hatched in May 2011 and was parent–reared at NZP. Kito was donated to ICF to be paired with our female Blue Crane, Veld. Veld lost her previous mate in 2009 and, as many visitors to ICF since then may know, hasn’t been comfortable spending much time on exhibit.

Wildlife Agency Urges Crane Spectators to Maintain Distance

As a pair of Whooping Cranes remains in North Carolina’s Clay County, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service urges spectators to maintain their distance in order to not spook the cranes and reduce their familiarity with humans.

“These cranes are among the rarest animals on the planet. In our efforts to recover this species, I can’t stress enough how important it is for people to give the birds the space they need to feel comfortable and go peacefully about their daily lives of finding food, water, shelter, and developing the bond that will lead to successful nesting in the spring,” said Bill Brooks, a biologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

School Field Trips

School field trips include fun, age-appropriate activities designed to engage students and their teachers. Our education department, staff and volunteers, would be delighted to share the stories of the world’s… Continue reading School Field Trips

North America

Issue The once threatened Sandhill Crane has made an inspiring comeback throughout much of its range. However, despite this success, the species continues to be threatened by power line collisions… Continue reading North America

Into The Wild

Over the last nearly 50 years, the International Crane Foundation and our partners have developed a series of reintroduction projects to establish new, wild Whooping Crane populations in North America.… Continue reading Into The Wild